Posts Tagged ‘Culture’

Ha’s Dance Video

Posted on: May 14th, 2015 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

Nothing draws young people together like the music and dance of their generation. On the other hand, few things divide parents and teens with equal force. In this video, Ha demonstrates her passion for Hip hop while her dad voices his concern that this type of dancing doesn’t represent their cultural values.  It’s a familiar story for many Americans but a new challenge for recent immigrants–many of whom come from very traditional cultures.

Kurdish and Arabic Culture

Posted on: June 25th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Heyam talks about growing up knowing both Kurdish and Arabic cultures. She lived in Baghdad and Erbil and is influenced by both cultures.

Who We Are: Progreso Community Center

Posted on: June 24th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Here at Progreso Community Center we have four different program areas: Community Organizing, Community Education, Health and Culture. All our programs are built to empower and build the capacity of the Hispanic community and general community here in Nashville. Come be a part of the exciting work we are doing!

Bhutanese Cultural Presentation

Posted on: June 23rd, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

A cultural presentation adorned by Bhutanese Nepali cultural songs and dances organized by Bhutanese Community of Tennessee in order to replicate the Bhutanese cultural and social fabric to the local and international community. Bhutanese participants from about 30 states participated during the historic cultural program.

Journey to America

Posted on: June 23rd, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Learning how to adapt into an American culture.

Kim’s Multicutural Montage

Posted on: March 20th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Next Door Neighbors Storytellers partnered up with students from Glencliff High School’s model UN program to document Cultural Explosion. In this video, Kim captures a day bursting with color, dance, food and music as students and guests talk about how Cultural Explosion has impacted them.

The Forgotten Legacy: Kurdish Handicraft Weaving

Posted on: March 8th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

This thoughtful piece by storyteller Kasar Abdulla introduces us to the Kurdish art of weaving. From socks and purses to hats and rugs, Kurdish women take pride in preserving the tradition of making intricate crafts with their own hands. Abdulla delves deep into the significance of the practice in difficult times, explaining that the women “relied on their weaving talents in refugee camps; they would turn something as simple as a potato sack into new purses and exchange it for food with the Turks.” A must-see story.

 

Reminders of Home on YouTube

Posted on: March 8th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

On the second day of our summer Storyteller Boot Camp, I joined Storytellers Prakash and Kamal in their homes as they told their first stories (with us anyways). While Kamal and Prakash were waiting to begin shooting the story about Nepali food culture, Kamal offered to show me a few videos of his former home in the Beldangi refugee camps of Nepal. There were several videos on YouTube featuring the camps and Kamal even pointed out his house in one of them. I had a camera with me and thought the experience was worth sharing.

These days, technology provides a blessing of communication for refugees whom in years past would have been further removed from their former life, their relatives and friends. Reminders of home, pictures, personal belongings often don’t make the trip with refugees when resettled. In some cases, sites like YouTube have replaced tangible items. Communication also allows families to help those left behind and find out quickly when events happen in locations that might not receive media attention here.

It is clear in this video that being reminded of home is bittersweet. I was struck by how both Kamal and Prakash struggle with the transition they have made. Life in America moves fast and forward with few available moments for reflection. I was pleased to witness this one.

2012 NETA Award for Best Nontraditional Community Engagement

Posted on: March 8th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

The NPT Storytellers team, from the left: Kevin Crane, Will Pedigo, and Soraya Salam

 

We are excited to share that last week, the Storytellers project received the 2012 National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA) award for Best Nontraditional Community Engagement. We are humbled by this recognition and glad that immigrant and refugee voices are being heard beyond Nashville. While this project hasn’t always been easy, it’s an initiative that we at NPT feel is important to our community.

Storytellers grew from the belief that immigrants and refugees in Nashville have important stories and perspectives to share. Often those stories remain untold. With making technology and training available, it is possible for immigrants to find and express their own voice. The result has been a broader awareness of communities and experiences that exist in our city.

Below are some of the judge’s comments about the project. Storytellers is much bigger than those of us at NPT; the real stars of the project are our immigrant storytellers, and the thoughtful, in-depth stories they continue to share with our community and beyond.

This online project is outstanding…The fact that this wonderful project and all of the work behind it happened on such a relatively small budget says a lot about the big success of this project.

The timeliness of this project is excellent given the pressing national immigration issue, especially regarding the concerns for humane treatment of immigrants across the country and how they can best be helped to thrive in this country.

If you want to connect with immigrants and refugees in your community- what better than to work with agencies that serve that population.

The strong partnership here easily could be considered innovative for a public media station…the stories are compelling and it’s no wonder that major national media has picked up on it.

Tennessee Foreign Language Institute’s very own, Thuy Rocco!

Posted on: March 8th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Storytellers is kicking off a new series of videos produced by members of Nashville’s vibrant immigrant community! In the coming weeks, you can look forward to stories from Burmese refugees who are part of Tennessee Foreign Language Institute’s ESL TO GO program as well as stories from students at two of Metro’s most diverse high schools — Overton and Antioch.

The first story in this new series comes from Tennessee Foreign Language Institute’s, Thuy Rocco. Today, Thuy is the Assistant ESL Director at TFLI. Her journey, however, began in Vietnam more than 25 years ago. It’s the story of a mother’s hope, a child’s potential and a family’s perseverance. Thank you for sharing, Thuy!

Wrestling with Change

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

Finding one’s place in life can be a challenge at any stage of the game. Every time we move schools or change jobs, it’s like starting over. For many refugees, the change is welcome but the challenges are steep. Just ask Choi. This soft spoken sophomore form Overton High had to grapple with bullying when he first moved to the U.S. a couple years ago. But don’t let his mild manor fool you. Through hard work and training, he’s become a winning wrestler, and along the way he’s learned some valuable life lessons.

 

Suan Lek on Cooking

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

If you haven’t tried Burmese cuisine, then there’s never been a better time. Suan Lek, pronounced (Swan Lake), is known as a fine chef in his community, but for this video he humbly offered to prepare a traditional tomato and egg dish that anybody can tackle. It’s a simple, inexpensive and delicious introduction to the taste of everyday Burmese cooking. Oh, and a special thanks to his ESL TO GO classmate, Dim Cing, for shooting this tasty video!

Deih Cing on Worship

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

For many of the Burmese refugees who now call Nashville home, freedom of religion hasn’t always been a guarantee. Having suffered religious persecution in Myanmar, ethnic minorities like the Kachin have embraced the ability to worship in freedom with a joy that literally pours over in this Storytellers video. Join Deih Cing as she leads her congregation in song at a Burmese church service.

Mary on Music and Learning

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

Much has been said about the evolving character of today’s young people. Now forget everything you’ve heard and meet Mary. Having learned English in less than two years, this 5th grader is an A-student and multi-instrumentalist. Her story is a tribute to the character of Nashville’s Burmese community and their young people’s potential to do great things even when faced with difficult odds.

Dim Cing on Family

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

Rocking out on guitar, eating Cheerios with friends, dancing, laughing, drawing and playing games on Mom’s phone–Yeah, that about sums up a good day for Dim Cing’s three-year-old daughter and one-year-old son. But it’s not about to end there. Dim Cing has big plans for her little rock stars.

Ja Ring on Education

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

 

Ja Ring just might be a journalist in the making. Her story chronicles the many obstacles she and fellow Burmese Kachin have faced in achieving a good education. It’s an exceptional tale of one woman’s journey from a Malaysian refugee camp where she served as a teacher to her life here in Nashville. Today, she continues her own learning in an effort to become a better English speaker while remaining committed to the cause of education in the refugee community.

I was alone

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

The struggle to learn English is a theme that resonates strongly with teenage immigrants. It can be particularly frustrating for middle and high school students, many of whom may have been good students in their countries of origin but struggle to even understand the teachers in American schools. This is the case for Treveena, a bright and ambitious Egyptian immigrant who is doing her best to excel.

Making friends with English

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

School age immigrants face a variety of unique challenges, but everything from making friends to making the grade weighs heavily on mastering the English language. In this story, Madonna questions her transition from top student in Egypt to one who is engaged in an uphill battle to make friends and do well in her new American environment.

Esther’s Story

Posted on: October 18th, 2013 by Shawn Anfinson No Comments

Many refugees come to Nashville hoping to establish a better life, a life free from the fear and persecution they endured in their countries of origin. Moving on, however, means leaving so much behind–things like homes, heirlooms, friends and even family. In this next video, Esther shares what it’s like to leave behind the thing that is dearest to her heart.

 

 

 

Crossing the Border

Posted on: November 26th, 2012 by Nashville Public Television No Comments

“They say a smile will be ultimately tears; and it’s very true.”

So begins this touching personal story by Cesar, a Mexican immigrant who unsuccessfully attempted to cross the border with his mother as a child. After being sent back to Mexico to live with relatives, he shares what it was like to be separated from his parents and eventually rejoined as they all sought a better life in America.

Storytellers: Inside a Hindu Naming Ceremony in Nashville

Posted on: September 4th, 2012 by nptnextdoorneighbors No Comments

Many cultures and religious traditions have rituals around the birth of a child. For many families who have settled in a new land, preserving these rituals is of utmost importance, even if only in the privacy of their own home.

In this video, storytellers Kamal Bastola and Prakash Subedi give us an intimate look at a Bhutanese family conducting a naming ceremony for a recent newborn baby, a traditional ceremony in Hindu custom.

Storytellers: Pope Shenouda`s passing by Sam Mounier

Posted on: May 22nd, 2012 by nptnextdoorneighbors No Comments

As Nashville Public Television prepares to unveil the latest installment in our Next Door Neighbors series -featuring Nashville’s Egyptian community – we wanted to share a Storytellers submission by NPT intern Sam Mounier.

Sam was a great help in the production of the latest Next Door Neighbors documentary.  As a member of the Egyptian community, he helped connect us to more than a few people, translated conversations, kept us informed of important events and even took us to his mom’s house for some delicious food.

During production of the Egyptian program, Nashville’s large contingency of Coptic Orthodox Christians suffered the tragic loss of their Pope.  Pope Shenouda, the 117th for the Coptic Orthodox Christian Church, played an important role in the growth of the Church in the United States.

We asked Sam to share how the loss of Pope Shenouda was felt by the Egyptian community in Nashville.  Here is what he had to say.


 

Next Door Neighbors:Egyptians premieres Wednesday, May 23rd at 9pm on NPT.  You can also watch the completed program that same day online at our website.

I hope you will tune in.

Will

(Storytellers) Inside an Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

Posted on: April 20th, 2012 by nptnextdoorneighbors No Comments

This video takes us inside the Nashville home of two Eastern Ethiopian women hosting a coffee ceremony, one of the most enjoyable events in Ethiopian culture. Storyteller Nejib Adem is their honorary guest as the women show him the steps it takes to prepare for the gathering. Prepare to be hungry by the end of watching this…

(Storytellers) The Forgotten Legacy: Kurdish Handicraft Weaving

Posted on: March 29th, 2012 by nptnextdoorneighbors No Comments

This thoughtful piece by storyteller Kasar Abdulla introduces us to the Kurdish art of weaving. From socks and purses to hats and rugs, Kurdish women take pride in preserving the tradition of making intricate crafts with their own hands. Abdulla delves deep into the significance of the practice in difficult times, explaining that the women “relied on their weaving talents in refugee camps; they would turn something as simple as a potato sack into new purses and exchange it for food with the Turks.” A must-see story.


(Storytellers) Fruits of Our Labor: A Look Inside a Kurdish Home Garden in Nashville

Posted on: October 12th, 2011 by nptnextdoorneighbors No Comments

This past spring, storyteller Kasar Abdulla shot this story about the common practice of growing home gardens in the Kurdish culture. “You will find that almost every Kurdish family in Nashville, Tennessee has a vegetable and fruit garden; not only because it’s symbolic and reminds them of Kurdistan, but they enjoy the delicious fruits and vegetables produced by their own hands,” she says.