NPT Antiques and Fine Arts Day Unearths Picasso, Babe Ruth, the New Testament and more

NPT's Antiques and Fine Arts Appraisal Day 2014

On Saturday, June 14, supporters of NPT in search of appraisal  gold gathered at the Factory in Franklin for NPT’s 5th Antiques and Fine Arts Appraisal Day.  Over a dozen local and regional appraisers were on hand to meet more than 300 registered attendees who brought in books, jewelry, prints, furniture, guitars, pop culture memorabilia and more. In addition to the success for the station — we raised nearly $30,000, almost doubling our fundraising goal — the day was a win for many of the attendees and appraisers.

“It was great a day for everyone involved — the appraisers, the guests and NPT,” said the event’s organizer Sheila Fischer, NPT Corporate & Community Development Manager. “Everyone had fun looking at each others’ items and guessing their value and authenticity. Even those folks that didn’t walk away with the jackpot were happy to have participated. It was a pleasure, too, to work with the Factory and hold the event at Jamison Hall, which provided the perfect backdrop for the day.”

Babe Ruth Baseball

Babe Ruth Baseball

Mike Cotter of Yeoman’s in the Fork, who said he saw better stuff this year than in previous years, was excited by several items that came into Jamison Hall. Among them was a 1611 copy of the New Testament published by Robert Barker, who also published the 1611 King James Bible.  It was the first one he had actually seen and was hesitant to put a value on it without further inspection, but said it would be quite a bit. Cotter was also thrilled to have an attendee bring in an 1885,  deluxe leather, first edition of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which Cotter appraised at least $10,000.

“He told me his granddaddy won it in a poker game,” Cotter said.  “It came in a barrel of books.” Cotter also appraised a promo photo signed by all four Beatles for $15,000, and a set of individual Beatles photos, also signed, at $5,000 each.

Berenice Denton, of Berenice Denton Estate Sales & Appraisals, had the hall buzzing when she appraised an early 1930′s baseball signed by Babe Ruth. Everything about it was authentic, according to Denton, down to the multicolor period stitching on the ball. Her appraisal valued the ball at around $20,000.

Not to be outdone, Rick Crane of Estate Antiques in Knoxville had art lovers clamoring for a look at the two white plaques made by Pablo Picasso that he appraised for $15,000-$20,000 each. Crane was also the happy appraiser of two Sanborn Mexican Candle sticks that he valued at $3,000 each.

This being the Nashville area, it was no surprise that George Gruhn of Gruhn Guitars had his hands busy all day playing and appraising instruments, including a 1952 Martin guitar he valued at $15,000

George Gruhn From Gruhn Guitars

George Gruhn From Gruhn Guitars

Joe Rosson of Art & Antique Appraisals by Joe Rossen also had a couple of exciting discoveries.  He valued a hand painted 1807  Pennsylvania Dutch Baptismal Certificate at $2,500 and a 1930 Steiff Mickey Mouse, with its tags, in perfect condition for $3,000 at auction.

Perhaps the biggest score of the event was by Mike Walton and his daughter Julie Walton of Walton’s Antique Jewelry in Franklin, who appraised a vintage 8 carat diamond ring made by Harry Winston valued at $250,000.

Other appriasers at the event included John Case of Case Antiques Inc. Auctions & Appraisals, Knoxville office, Sarah Campbell of Case Antiques Inc. Auctions & Appraisals, Nashville office, Carrie Gough of Veritas Fine Art Appraisals & Consulting, LLC, in Chicago, Mike Mouret of Nashville Coin & Currency, Inc. in Nashville, Sam Holden of Pickle Road Appraisers in Nashville, S.D. (Robin) Sinclair, Ph.D. of Sinclair Appraisals in Nashville, and J.T. Thompson of Lotz House in Franklin.

The sponsor for the event was Crosslin and Associates, PC. Business supporters were Franklin Marriott Cool Springs, Stoveworks Restaurant and Catering in Franklin, The Factory in Franklin and Bongo Java Roasting Company”

Thanks to everyone who came out!

NPT’s next Antiques and Fine Arts Appraisal Day will be held in June, 2015 at the Factory in Franklin. Keep an eye on our website for details.

More Photos —>

Read the rest of NPT Antiques and Fine Arts Day Unearths Picasso, Babe Ruth, the New Testament and more

John Seigenthaler Named 2014 Powerhouse Award Recipient (VIDEO)

John Seigenthaler (AP/Mark Humphrey)

John Seigenthaler (AP/Mark Humphrey)

(Ed. Note. John Seigenthaler died on Friday, July 11. He was 86. To read a remembrance by NPT, please visit this link. For his obituary, please visit The Tennessean).

John Seigenthaler, longtime host of NPT’s A Words on Words, humanitarian, journalist, defender of the First Amendment and so much more, was honored in late April by You Have the Power with its 2014 Powerhouse Award. The event at the Country Music Association Theater of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum followed a public dedication  of the Shelby Street Bridge as “John Seigenthaler Walking Bridge.”

The hour-long program, captured in its entirety by the Renaissance Center, in the video embedded below by the Renaissance Center, featured friends from John’s remarkable life, including his work with the Freedom Riders and Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s; his career as reporter, editor and publisher of The Tennessean newspaper as well as founding Editorial Director for USA Today; and his commitment to the First Amendment Center and Freedom Forum of the John Seigenthaler Center at Vanderbilt University. The presentation was written by John’s niece, Katie Seigenthaler of Seigenthaler Public Relations and directed by theatre veteran Denice Hicks, Artistic Director of the Nashville Shakespeare Festival.

The evening included a performance by Freedom Sings, an all-star musical group created by Ken Paulson, President of the First Amendment Center. The act includes an impressive group of hit song makers and Grammy winners that, for this show, will include acclaimed Americana artist Jonell Mosser, popular singer/songwriter Bill Lloyd, John Deadrick on keyboards and Grammy Award entertainer and YHTP Board member Linda Davis.

You Have the Power’s Powerhouse Award was established in 2013 to honor an individual’s commitment to victims and victims’ rights issues. This occasion is the key event for both fundraising and public awareness for You Have the Power, which is celebrating its 21st year of service to the community and state.

 

New NPT Children`s Schedule

Arthur

To better serve your children’s programming needs, we occasionally make some shifts in the PBS Kids schedule. This latest change, effective June 2, 2014,  stacks some of the most popular shows, so kids can get twice as much Sesame Street, Wild Kratts, Curious George and Arthur. Enjoy!

6:00 a.m. Wild Kratts

6:30 Wild Kratts

7:00 Curious George

7:30 Curious George

8:00 Peg+Cat

8:30 Dinosaur Train

9:00 Sesame Street

9:30 Sesame Street

10:00 Daniel Tiger

10:30 Super Why

11:00 Dinosaur Train

11:30 Sid the Science Kid

12:00 p.m. Caillou

12:30 Thomas and Friends

1:00 Peg+Cat

1:30 The Cat in the Hat

2:00 Curious George

2:30 Curious George

3:00 Arthur

3:30 Arthur

4:00 Wild Kratts

4:30 Wild Kratts

5:00 Martha Speaks

5:30 Wordgirl

`Children`s Health Crisis: Food` Premieres Online May 22

 

CHC Food OVEE

“Food,” the latest episode in NPT’s Emmy® Award-winning “Children’s Health Crisis” series will premiere online on Thursday, May 22 at 12 p.m. Central  (noon) in advance of its broadcast premiere later that night at 8 p.m. on NPT. The online screening will be presented via OVEE, a public media platform that enables people anywhere to watch a film together and chat both during and after the screening.

To access the screening on Thursday, May 22 at 12 p.m. Central , visit https://ovee.itvs.org/screenings/4oora. You can login with your Facebook account (easiest and OVEE doesn’t post anything to your profile), you can go earlier and create a user and password, or you can just join in anonymously. Guests on the screening and chat will include the documentary’s producer, Will Pedigo.

Nearly 16 million children in the United States have limited or uncertain access to adequate food. While the American Heart Association recommends high-school aged children eat 3 servingsof vegetables a day, in Tennessee only 13% achieve that goal. Additionally, nearly one in five adolescents skips breakfast, and one in three children is obese or overweight.

In “Food,  hosted by Kimberly Williams-Paisley (“Nashville,” “Two and Half Men,” “Father of the Bride”) we ask, “What is standing between us and a healthy relationship to food?” The documentary draws on doctors, nutritionists, policy makers, community advocates, parents and more to explore the roles of everything from breastfeeding to farming subsidies to food marketing to family dinners to discover how our relationship to food is established and maintained, and the impact that has on our health.

For more on the documentary, see the official release on our blog.

Preview:

(Bonus British Perspective) `Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 8

In addition to the faculty of the Vanderbilt School of Nursing guest blogging for us each Monday morning about the previous night’s episode of Call the Midwife — airing on Sundays on NPT and PBS Stations nationwide at 7:00 p.m. Central, March 30-May 18 — we are thrilled to have a bonus blogger. Rachel Sykes, who did a practicum at the Vanderbilt School of Nursing in the summer 0f 2013, is a registered midwife and graduate from the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. She’s watched the show on the BBC and will provide a unique UK-perspective. She currently practices in a busy maternity unit in the Northwest of England. SPOILER ALERT: Some posts may contain spoilers, so please be aware of that.

Call the Midwife Episode 8

By Rachel Sykes

Rachel Sykes Headshot

It’s always sad to see the end of this popular series. I really love the great acting, story lines and adventures of the Nonnatus midwives. I will miss curling up on the sofa on a Sunday night, getting lost in the nostalgia and romance of Call the Midwife. This final week is a mixture of drama, sadness, hope and new beginnings. Jenny (Jessica Raine) is doubtful of her future as a midwife and rethinks what she is truly passionate about. I have been here many times. I spent my twenties doing various things but always had midwifery in the forefront of my mind. After much soul searching, a fashion degree, some overseas travel and various interesting jobs later, I began my midwifery training at age 29. It takes some people time to realise what they really want to do with their lives; some know from an early age and some never truly know. It is helpful to remember that life is not a race but an interesting journey with endless corridors, of which we have freedom to choose. It is difficult to know which road to take but over the years I have learned to listen to my gut instinct and it has never let me down.

This episode demonstrates life’s continuous changeability. Jenny meets her husband to be and goes on to a new way of caring. Chummy cares for her dying mother who moves from this world to a new one and Dr Turner and his wife Shelagh welcome a new baby into their family. Jenny decides to move into palliative care of the dying, a career which no doubt takes a certain type of person. This is a stark contrast to working as a midwife, but in essence, the same kind of compassion and sensitivity is required. Midwives rarely deal with death, but are not completely immune. When it happens, it does shake staff to the core and the person sadly involved is always remembered.

It is so funny to see how men are ‘banned’ from being with their partners whilst giving birth during the 1950s. This would be unheard of nowadays and it shows how things have changed dramatically. I sometimes feel a bit sorry for the birth partners (particularly the men) as they often say they feel helpless whilst their ladies are in labour. It is quite normal for a father to be quivering in the corner not knowing what to do with himself or turning a whitish, green colour when the baby finally makes an appearance (obviously being British we ask them if they would like a cup of tea). One of the nicest things about my job is that you get to see a lot of men cry! It is such a touching moment when their baby comes into the world and I have seen the biggest and toughest of men weep buckets! Being at the birth of a new life is wonderful, it never ‘gets old’ and I hope I will never become bláze or complacent as my career progresses. I am already looking forward to the 2015 series, until then I will have to make do with all the excitement and challenges of midwifery in the real world!

Rachel Sykes is a registered midwife and graduate from the University of Manchester, United Kingdom.

Missed our analysis of the Previous Season’s Episodes? Read them here.

Missed an episode? Watch full episodes for a limited time on NPT’s “Watch Now” Video Portal here.

`Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 8: Beginnings and Goodbyes

For the third season in-a-row, we are honored to have the faculty of the Vanderbilt School of Nursing back to guest blog for us each Monday morning about the previous night’s episode of Call the Midwife, airing on Sundays on NPT and PBS Stations nationwide at 7:00 p.m. Central, March 30-May 18. Check in here every Monday morning for the next eight weeks for historical and contemporary context on the show, and some fun discussion. Plus, this year we’ll have the occasional bonus blog from across the pond to get the British perspective. So be sure to check the blog TWICE on Mondays. SPOILER ALERT: Some posts may contain spoilers, so please be aware of that.

Call the Midwife Episode 8

By Margaret Buxton MSN CNM

Margaret BuxtonThe last episode was a “good death” as we were told. It was full of love and remembrance, knowledge, hellos, and good-byes. I couldn’t help but think of the recent celebration of Mother’s Day and the themes of the mother-child relationships in this episode. The bond of mother and child is more powerful than most, and how it comes to be or what shapes it has ripples in our lives forever. The arc between the terrible ending Sister Monica Joan (Judy Parfitt) experiences with her mother and that of Chummy (Miranda Hart) with the mother at the end of her life reminded us of the power of forgiveness and the sweetness of redemption. Both of these daughters were able to find peace in “getting it right” at the end of life. Sheila’s adoption experienced as “birth” was a touching reminder that Mothers and children can be united in many different ways.

I wrote in a previous season about the connection between midwifery and hospice care. It is as if the beginning and the end are so far apart that they come full circle to touch each other. In both settings, the presence that is created by the midwife, nurse, and/or families is what creates the beautiful space to let life take its first breath or breathe its last. The “space” is not only physical but can be an emotional and spiritual one: a reverent silence, a washcloth at just the right moment, a soothing sound of comfort, or a gentle hand for help. These environments are not easily created in the busy healthcare settings we are familiar with in the US, but they are still something that I aspire to every time I am with a laboring mother and will be inspired to create when I am called to be with someone at the end of their life. Jenny’s desire to pursue hospice nursing seemed a perfect fit for her, but it was sad to say good-bye to this beloved character and this amazing season.

I have so loved this show and am thankful to the creators and the artists who brought it alive. Thank you Call the Midwife!

Margaret Buxton, MSN CNM, is a Certified Nurse-Midwife, Instructor of Nursing, Vanderbilt School of Nursing and Clinical Practice Director, West End Women’s Health Center.

Missed our analysis of the Previous Season’s Episodes? Read them here.

Missed an episode? Watch full episodes for a limited time on NPT’s “Watch Now” Video Portal here.

Call the Midwife Episode 8

(Bonus British Perspective) `Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 7

In addition to the faculty of the Vanderbilt School of Nursing guest blogging for us each Monday morning about the previous night’s episode of Call the Midwife — airing on Sundays on NPT and PBS Stations nationwide at 7:00 p.m. Central, March 30-May 18 — we are thrilled to have a bonus blogger. Rachel Sykes, who did a practicum at the Vanderbilt School of Nursing in the summer 0f 2013, is a registered midwife and graduate from the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. She’s watched the show on the BBC and will provide a unique UK-perspective. She currently practices in a busy maternity unit in the Northwest of England. SPOILER ALERT: Some posts may contain spoilers, so please be aware of that.

Call the MIdwife, Season 3, Episode 7

By Rachel Sykes 

Rachel Sykes HeadshotThe opening to this episode sees Pamela Saint’s baby being born ‘in the caul.’ On rare occasions, the membranes do not rupture prior to birth and the baby ventures into the world in the bag of amniotic fluid. There is an old wives tale that a baby which is born in the membranes is good luck and was believed to protect the child from drowning. It was often sold at auction to nervous sailors who perceived it as a welcome shield from the unforgiving ocean. This probably would not translate well to modern times, and may seem a little far-fetched. ‘I would like to buy some caul please, as I am going on a Caribbean cruise next week.’ You could only imagine the look you would receive!

Pamela (Sophie Rundle) captures our attention this week with her sudden onset of extreme paranoia shortly after the birth of her baby. Puerperal psychosis is a rare, but a serious psychiatric condition which is rapid in onset, usually within the first 14 days postpartum. You may be surprised to learn that in the late 1990s, suicide was the overall leading cause of maternal death in the UK. This thankfully declined in the years to follow and may be viewed as a positive reflection of our ability to identify women at risk of psychiatric illness and to provide them with the care and support they need.

Read the rest of (Bonus British Perspective) `Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 7

‘Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 7: Rare Scenarios

For the third season in-a-row, we are honored to have the faculty of the Vanderbilt School of Nursing back to guest blog for us each Monday morning about the previous night’s episode of Call the Midwife, airing on Sundays on NPT and PBS Stations nationwide at 7:00 p.m. Central, March 30-May 18. Check in here every Monday morning for the next eight weeks for historical and contemporary context on the show, and some fun discussion. Plus, this year we’ll have the occasional bonus blog from across the pond to get the British perspective. So be sure to check the blog TWICE on Mondays. SPOILER ALERT: Some posts may contain spoilers, so please be aware of that.

Call the Midwife Season 2 episode 7

By Michelle Collins PhD, CNM

Michelle Collins

Picture a group of screenwriters sitting around a table and one says “for this episode, let’s include some really RARE things that happen in childbirth…” Guessing this had to have been the case with this week’s episode because three rare events that occur in relation to childbirth were featured. The first was referred to as a “mermaid’s birth” – in which the baby was born with the amniotic sac intact, (“en caul” as it is commonly known). Legend has it that carrying a piece of the amniotic sac, or caul, is a sort of good luck charm, and a protection to the carrier against drowning. For this reason, pieces of the caul were once highly sought by sailors, as we saw the woman in the show save hers for her husband who worked on the river. Babies born en caul are rumored to have special powers of perception bestowed upon them. Estimates vary, but being born en caul occurs only about one in every 1,000 births. Check out this blog with a very cool video of en caul birth:

The second rare situation featured was that of the prolapsed cord that Jenny Lee discovered on the laboring woman. The majority of the time when a woman’s “water breaks,” the presenting part of the baby (hopefully head) comes down snugly against the cervix. Occasionally, though, the baby’s umbilical cord falls down in front of the baby’s presenting part, and is referred to as prolapsed. The incidence of this is 1 in 1000 births. It is a true emergency, as pressure on the cord from the baby’s body decreases the blood flow, and hence oxygenation, to the baby, creating a life threatening situation for baby. When the prolapsed cord is discovered, the mother is positioned on her hands and knees with her head down low, and rear end up in the air. This position encourages the baby’s body to move to the top pf the mother’s uterus, and is an attempt to keep pressure off of the umbilical cord.

Read the rest of ‘Call the Midwife` Recaps: Season 3: Episode 7: Rare Scenarios

‘NPT Reports: Children’s Health Crisis` Focuses on Food | Premieres Online and On-Air May 22

We announced today the latest installment in our Children’s Health Crisis series, this one focusing on the connection between food and health, which premieres both online and on-air on May 22. We will also preview the documentary with a screening and lunchtime discussion at Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle TN on May 20, with CHC host Kimberly Williams-Paisley in attendance and several notable Nashville nutritionists and advocates on the panel. There are still a few seats left at this event. Those wishing to attend should RSVP at Second Harvest Food Bank’s website or directly here: http://bit.ly/1jfKf2J.

Keep an eye on wnpt.org for information on the advance online preview on May 22.  Full press release below. Thanks!

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

NPT Explores the Relationship Between Children’s Health and Food in the Latest Installment of ‘Children’s Health Crisis.’

‘NPT Reports: Children’s Health Crisis: Food,’ hosted by Kimberly Williams Paisley, premieres May 22 online and on-air; advance screening and discussion to be held May 20 at Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – May 9, 2014 – Nearly 16 million children in the United States have limited or uncertain access to adequate food. While the American Heart Association recommends high-school aged children eat 3 servingsof vegetables a day, in Tennessee only 13% achieve that goal. Additionally, nearly one in five adolescents skips breakfast, and one in three children is obese or overweight.

N:\Children's Health\PROMOTIONS\KWP shoot

Kimberly Williams-Paisley

In “Food,” the latest installment in its Emmy® Award-winning “NPT Reports: Children’s Health Crisis” series, hosted by Kimberly Williams-Paisley (“Nashville,” “Two and Half Men,” “Father of the Bride”) and premiering online and on-air on Thursday, May 22, Nashville Public Television (NPT) asks, “What is standing between us and a healthy relationship to food?” The documentary, produced by Will Pedigo, draws on doctors, nutritionists, policy makers, community advocates, parents and more to explore the roles of everything from breastfeeding to farming subsidies to food marketing to family dinners to discover how our relationship to food is established and maintained, and the impact that has on our health.

“NPT Reports: Children’s Health Crisis: Food” will premiere online on Thursday, May 22 at noon via the OVEE online engagement web viewer, and at 8:00 p.m. that same evening on-air at NPT-Channel 8. Those wishing to attend the advance online screening should visit wnpt.org or the direct link of https://ovee.itvs.org/screenings/4oora the day of the screening.

The documentary will be previewed on Tuesday, March 20 with a special lunchtime screening and discussion at Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee. Paisley will be among the guest speakers, along with Jaynee Day, president and CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank, and Courtney Grimes Cuden, a psychotherapist and director of programs and outreach for Eating Disorders Coalition of Tennessee, both of whom both appear in the documentary; Beth Curley, president and CEO of NPT, Megan Morton, executive director, Community Food Advocates; and Dianne Killebrew, M.Ed. R.D., L.D.N. educational coordinator, Vanderbilt. Jennifer Justus, notable food writer and advocate, will moderate the discussion.

The event will take place on Tuesday, May 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and include lunch catered by Second Harvest’s Culinary Arts Center. Second Harvest Food Bank is located at 331 Great Circle Road, Nashville, Tenn., 37228.

Members of the media wishing to attend the event should RSVP with Joe Pagetta at jpagetta@wnpt.org This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or (615) 259-9325 ext. 211.

Read the rest of ‘NPT Reports: Children’s Health Crisis` Focuses on Food | Premieres Online and On-Air May 22

‘Call the Midwife’ Recaps: Season 2: Episode 6: Don`t Let Misfortunes Find a Home

For the third season in-a-row, we are honored to have the faculty of the Vanderbilt School of Nursing back to guest blog for us each Monday morning about the previous night’s episode of Call the Midwife, airing on Sundays on NPT and PBS Stations nationwide at 7:00 p.m. Central, March 30-May 18. Check in here every Monday morning for the next eight weeks for historical and contemporary context on the show, and some fun discussion. Plus, this year we’ll have the occasional bonus blog from across the pond to get the British perspective. So be sure to check the blog TWICE on Mondays. SPOILER ALERT: Some posts may contain spoilers, so please be aware of that.

CTM_blog_06_09_35MB

By Margaret Buxton MSN CNM

Margaret BuxtonThis episode reminded me again that East London in the 1950s was a community of war survivors, and the aftermath of that would be felt for generations. The unique pairing of Nurse Mount (Emerald Fennell), a sometimes harsh, all-business midwife and nurse with the sensitive war veteran suffering physically from being a prisoner of a Japanese war camp brought into view a shared space: they both had experienced the horrors of being a prisoner of war and survived. The contrast was in their attitudes. The nurse was clearly holding her pain and suffering emotionally. The patient was suffering physically but had “let go” of his prisoner experience to enjoy life.

I am continually inspired by stories of survival and intrigued specifically with the stories that come out of situations like this veteran experienced. In reading other stories of World War II survivors of Japanese prisoner of war camps, I came across story after story of what kept these men (and sometimes women) alive. They all seemed to be able to stay “in the moment” of where they were – not looking back and not looking forward to rescue. They chose instead to live each day, fight to stay alive, and find hope in the present moment. The veteran’s words to Nurse Blount at the end of the show stayed with me:

“Don’t let your misfortunes find a home.”

Helping women through childbirth is my invitation to stay in the moment; I am daily inspired by the women we serve at Vanderbilt!

Margaret Buxton, MSN CNM, is a Certified Nurse-Midwife, Instructor of Nursing, Vanderbilt School of Nursing and Clinical Practice Director, West End Women’s Health Center.

Read our Bonus British Perspective of this episode by Rachel Sykes here.

Missed our analysis of the Previous Season’s Episodes? Read them here.

Missed an episode? Watch full episodes for a limited time on NPT’s “Watch Now” Video Portal here.